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Olympic was designed as a luxury ship; Titanic's passenger facilities, fittings, deck plans and technical facilities were largely identical to Olympic, although with some small variations. The first-class passengers enjoyed luxurious cabins, and some were equipped with private bathrooms. First-class passengers could have meals in the ship's large and luxurious dining saloon or in the more intimate A La Carte Restaurant. There was a lavish Grand Staircase, built only for the Olympic-class ships, along with three lifts that ran behind the staircase down to E deck, a Georgian-style smoking room, a Veranda Café decorated with palm trees, a swimming pool, Turkish bath, gymnasium, and several other places for meals and entertainment.

The second-class facilities included a smoking room, a library, a spacious dining room, and a lift.

Finally, the third-class passengers enjoyed reasonable accommodation compared to other ships, if not up to the second and first classes. Instead of large dormitories offered by most ships of the time, the third-class passengers of Olympic travelled in cabins containing two to ten bunks. Facilities for the third class included a smoking room, a common area, and a dining room.

Olympic had a cleaner, sleeker look than other ships of the day: rather than fitting her with bulky exterior air vents, Harland and Wolff used smaller air vents with electric fans, with a "dummy" fourth funnel used for additional ventilation. For the power plant Harland and Wolff employed a combination of reciprocating engines with a centre low-pressure turbine, as opposed to the steam turbines used on Cunard's Lusitania and Mauretania. White Star had successfully tested this engine set up on an earlier liner SS Laurentic, where it was found to be more economical than expansion engines or turbines alone. Olympic consumed 650 tons of coal per 24 hours with an average speed of 21.7 knots on her maiden voyage, compared to 1000 tons of coal per 24 hours for both Lusitania and Mauretania.
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HMT Olympic in her wartime dazzle paint scheme. In May 1918, while transporting the US 59th Infantry Regiment, Olympic rammed and sank U-103, which was trying to torpedo her at the time.
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This is the only known authentic color photo of any of the 3 Olympic class ships…the ship in the drydock is the RMS Mauretania, and in the background you can see three of the Olympic's four funnels.
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RMS Olympic departing New York on her maiden return voyage with an estimated 10,000 people gathered to watch, June 28th, 1911
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The HMHS Britannic was the youngest sister of the RMS Olympic & RMS Titanic: it was operated as a hospital ship during WWI, until its sinking in 1916 in the Aegean Sea due to a naval mine

This is its shiprwreck, at 119 m of depth

https://www.pbs.org/lostliners/britannic.html
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Across the corridor from the Turkish Baths was a heated swimming pool measuring an impressive 30 ft. long X 14 ft. wide and 7 ft. deep. Water depth was 5 ft. 4 in. at the deep end and 4 ft. 6 in. at the shallow end.  Heated salt water from a tank and cold sea water were pumped into the pool once the ship was out to sea. The room offered 13 changing cubicles and 2 shower stalls for convenience. The floors were tiled in blue and white linoleum, and a marble stair with teak footholds descended into the pool. The pool cost 1 shilling (£5 in 2019) or $0.25 to use but was open to men free of charge between 6 and 8 a.m., for early morning exercise.

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